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Pyro3 Levels

Pyro 3, 2, 1, ¦ Launch


So what's the difference between a Pyro 3, Pyro 2, and Pyro 1 other than the number? Glad you asked. First, it is important to understand that what you call High Power Rocketry, or HPR, the Office of the State Fire Marshal refers to as Experimental High Power Rocketry, or EHPR. EHPR is limited to commercial motors bearing the seal of the OSFM with a per motor impulse less than or equal to 10,240 Newton-seconds (M class).

Pyrotechnics Operator Rocketry Class 3 (Pyro 3) is where we all start. The Pyro 3 is allowed to possess, receive, transport, store, and launch EHPR rockets only using commercial solid fuel motors bearing the seal of the OSFM. The individual motors must be M impulse or less, and the total impulse for the rocket must be N impulse or less.

The Pyro 3 applicant must have reference letters from five current Cal Pyro 3, 2, 1, or unlimited license holders, who have held their Pyro 3 license for more than one year and must pass the Pyro 3 test.

Pyrotechnics Operator Rocketry Class 2 (Pyro 2) must have held a Pyro 3 license for two years. The Pyro 2 is allowed to ossess, receive, transport, store, and launch rockets using any solid fuel motor, commercial or otherwise. Commercial motors must bear the seal of the OSFM. There is no specific restriction on motor size; however there is a distinction between EHPR and unlimited rocket motors. Rockets using motors outside the definition of EHPR must be launched from a range with significant size, approval, and construction differences (ie., Bunkers and blockhouses) from an EHPR range.

The Pyro 2 applicant must have reference letters from five current Cal Pyro 2, 1, or unlimited license holders, who have held their Pyro 2 license for more than one year and must pass the Pyro 2 test.

Pyrotechnics Operator Rocketry Class 1 (Pyro 1) must have held a Pyro 2
license for two years. The Pyro 1 is allowed to possess, receive, transport, store, and launch rockets using any rocket motor technology. There is no specific restriction on motor size; however there is a distinction between EHPR and unlimited rocket motors. Rockets using motors outside the definition of EHPR must be launched from a range with significant size, approval, and construction differences (ie., Bunkers and blockhouses) from an EHPR range.

The Pyro 1 applicant must have reference letters from five current Cal Pyro 1, or unlimited license holders, who have held their Pyro 1 license for more than one year and must pass the Pyro 1 test.